Home / Creekbank Blog / 4 slots left on next weekend’s “Creekbank Weekend”.
Louisiana's No Man's Land is a region of mystery, legends, and great stories.

4 slots left on next weekend’s “Creekbank Weekend”.

A Word from Curt at The Old House.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many of you took part in our Kickstarter campaign in May. By pre-ordering copies of As the Crow Flies, you received discounted copies and helped fund the book. I’ll be forever grateful for the sixty people who backed us for $4800.00. (Our goal was $4000).

One of our reward packages was a special weekend in my hometown of Dry Creek. We have four (4) remaining slots left on this weekend scheduled for February 23-24, 2018. Each slot costs $200 and we’ve got room for four more people.

Use the website contact menu or Email us at curt@creekbank.net to sign up. We will contact the first four contacts, who will send a $100 non-refundable check to confirm their slot.

This Friday-Saturday (Feb. 23-24) event includes:
Private accommodations at Dry Creek Baptist Camp’s famous White House B and B.
3 great Dry Creek meals: Roast beef dinner, country breakfast, and fried catfish lunch.
Registration begins at 5:00 with dinner at 6:30 pm.

On Friday evening, we’ll make a Dry Creek tour of favorite places from Curt’s thirteen books: The Old House, The Friendship Lane, The Evergreen Cedar Tree, Sugar’s Grave, Dry Creek’s White House, Bro. Hodges’ Best Sermon, A Father’s Love, The Prayer Garden, and much more.
We’ll end the evening with one of Dry Creek’s famous hayrides and campfire.

After a scrumptious Saturday Dry Creek breakfast, we’ll load up in a van and go to Ten Mile and Westport. This is the setting of the Westport Fight that is the central story of As the Crow Flies. You’ll meet my hero and friend, Greg Johnson, the model for Unk Dyal in all three of The Westport Trilogy* series.

We’ll visit the Westport Fight site/sign, Occupy 1 cemetery and the grave of Rev. Joseph Willis. We’ll drive to the Calcasieu River where the No Man’s Land began for pioneers traveling west.
We’ll cross the Confederate Military Road that connected Alexandria and Niblett’s Bluff, the northernmost port on the Sabine River.
Our final stop will be the Queen of the Frontier, Sugartown. It was the once largest village between Alexandria and Lake Charles. It’s nothing but a dusty crossroads now, but history still abounds in this place. The second half of As the Crow Flies takes place in Sugartown, the hometown of my ancestors.

 

We’ll return to Dry Creek for a late lunch, say our goodbyes, and send you home happy, full, and satisfied.
I’m excited just thinking about the weekend. Rain or shine, it’ll be fun and informative.

*Each attendee will receive the entire Westport Series: The Wayfaring Stranger, A Good Place, and As the Crow Flies.

About Curt Iles

I write to have influence and impact through well-told stories of my Louisiana and African sojourn.

Check Also

A Pineywoods Manifesto: Chapter 1 Part 2: Eye to Eye

  We’re (yes, you’re part of this project) writing an e-book entitled, A Pineywoods Manifesto: ...

2 comments

  1. Debbie Branigan

    Read about April 6 and Whippoorwill Day and on the same day was dealing with devastating news that my husband of 46 years kidney cancer may have returned. My husband and I were born and raised in SOUTH Louisiana – NEW ORLEANS area- as was my 18 year old grandson who is now living with us in lovely Lecompte. Trying to digest what the Doctor had told us, we took a ride to Indian Creek about 5:30 P.M. and I was telling them both about your Whippoorwill Day – it was just about dusk and we saw a sign about a cabin for rent and turned off to take a quick peek. We heard a loud unusual sound and both my husband and grandson were looking at me and saying “It’s the Whippoorwill” “Is that it?” I was surprised and listened again and realized that the sound was not the call of the Whippoorwill but the loud braying of a hungry donkey! Neither husband or grandson had ever heard a donkey bray before but I recognized the sound since I asked about it the first time I heard it also. Next year, when you listen for the Whippoorwill, if you hear a donkey braying you will smile and think of the crazy Branigan’s and their introduction to the sounds of country living!

    • Debbie,

      That’s a remarkable story. A braying donkey!
      I didn’t hear a whippoorwill on April 6 but am continuing to roam the woods to hear one.
      Praying for your husband and his cancer diagnosis.

      Keep me posted.

      Curt Iles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shares