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Heartbroken: South Sudan

Update: From Louisiana

  Sojourn:   a temporary stay.   Friday,  3 July    You’ve held the rope by praying! DeDe and I have been traveling since Tuesday night. Here’s a quick update: -We left Uganda at midnight on June 30. (Our time zone there is 8 + ...

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At Garissa Part III

Tested faith can become stronger faith.   A word from Curt Today concludes the third part of a story,  “At Garissa.” It’s built around a recent tragedy in Kenya where Al Shabab terrorists killed nearly 150 college students. It is a harrowing story that has ...

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Though dead, he speaketh still . . .

A word from Curt Today is a travel day Up Country. Upcountry is that part of Uganda above the Nile River. It’s Wild. Open. Rustic. Beautiful. Frustrating. Pray for Charlie, Shane, and me as we travel. I can’t wait to show Shane Wilber this spot ...

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Different Mother, Same Father

3 Key Prayer Points: Our home church, Dry Creek Baptist (La), arrives on May 7 for a week among their people group, the Kakwa. Curt and DeDe as they plan a late May trip to the Gambela region of Ethiopia. Wisdom and safety as we ...

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11 South Sudanese Churches you can pray for

You may not have any desire to come to South Sudan and its borderlands. But that doesn’t mean you cannot pray. You can pray for these churches and pastors from your prayer closet in America. But be warned:  these strategic leaders and churches may capture ...

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Holding the Rope: How you can be involved

 We call it “Holding the rope.” This saying goes back to the first Baptist missionary, William Carey. Before leaving for Asia, he told his fellow believers, “If you’ll hold the rope, I’ll go down in the well.” We are dependent on our friends in America ...

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The Things that Matter

Question: what’s the most precious material possession you’ve lost? Reply here or in form at end of post. . . .  it was a reminder that the things in life that matter aren’t things.   I stared at the Ethiopian security worker as she removed ...

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Gulu . . . Looking Back

The Gulu Schoolchildren Statue Gulu in the Rear View Mirror   We drive through the dusty main street of Gulu, Uganda. Heading south. Tired but happy after two weeks of Up Country travel. Leaving the land of cold showers and hot cokes for the relative ...

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From the Land of Double Negatives

I’ve just spent two weeks on the edge of a Civil War. I don’t how to describe it without using double negatives. I ain’t never seen nothing like it.    It’s all right (sometimes) to use a double negative. For emphasis.  To catch the attention ...

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Lifting the Barn . . . Together

Lifting the Barn. Together we can do it. Even if you skip today’s post, don’t miss this video of several hundred people moving a barn in Nebraska. http://youtu.be/o83W0gj_CRE is my favorite “Pamoja” story: Herman Ostry’s barn floor was under twenty-nine inches of water because of ...

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“Lagniappe” Ch. 39 from Trampled Grass

         A word from Curt Today’s word is lagniappe. You’ll learn more about this neat word in today’s post. Enjoy!   We’re posting chapters from our new ebook,  Trampled Grass, daily. Tomorrow is the last chapter. We believe you’ll enjoy today’s story, “Lagniappe.”* ...

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“Storm Fatigue” Ch. 33 from ‘Trampled Grass’

We are humbled and honored that nearly 1000 readers like you are daily visiting our blog.  If you enjoy what you read, please use one of the social media buttons (above) to spread the word. Thank you, Curt Iles Creekbank Stories: Stories Worth Telling   ...

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Storm Fatigue

Prayer Update: Bob, Robert Franklin, and I leave Tuesday for a trip to Adjumani Camps in Uganda. Please pray for us as we share from the Storying Cloth, distribute Audio Storytellers in Dinka, Arabic, and Madi. We’ll be tweeting at hashtag  #UpCountry and Facebook at ...

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Jonah and Jovan: “Wow!”

A word from Curt: “Wow!’ We got out of the Land Cruiser on the dusty Ugandan road.  In the distance, about 3 km away, was the refugee camp called Boroli. I turned to Jovan one of our young church leaders, “Jovan, that’s Boroli Camp.  The ...

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