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A Brighter Day for Louisiana

A Brighter Day for Louisiana

I’ve been a “Louisianian” (doesn’t that word roll off your tongue well) for all of my life. In those fifty plus years, I’ve never been prouder to say this is my state than now. (I’ve always been proud, have chosen to live here, raise my family, and cast my lot as a citizen.)

I believe we are at a wonderful crossroads of opportunity for our state. New state leadership, our continuing recovery from the storms, and a fresh wind of change blowing across Louisiana have me excited.

I’ve decided to make a personal list of five (5) things I will do to continue being part of making our state better. These 5 steps are simple, but what I can– and will–do.

1. I will speak positively about our state. Sure, I’ll laugh and enjoy the jokes, but I will be serious about sharing the beauty, benefits, and benevolence of Louisiana.

2. I will keep the roadsides near my home litter-free. I live on a state highway and the trash accumulates quickly. Our litter is a blight on the state and drives off business and gives such a negative impression to visitors.
So I’ll do what I can– Keep my section of La. 394 clean.
One of my childhood friends, who now resides in Oregon, told me of how different litter is in the Northwest. All carbonated bottles/cans have a nickel deposit. If they can do it, why can’t we in Louisiana?
When we clean up our trash problem (and we can) we will be a much better state.
I’ve chosen to be part of that solution along La. 394.

3. I’ll be personally involved in helping with the education of our children. As a former teacher/principal I know how a good education benefits everyone.
As a writer, I will seek out opportunities to be at schools and among young people reading, telling stories, and encouraging learning. We must do better on education if Louisiana is to be better. We can do it, but everyone must help.

4. I will look for ways to help the less fortunate. The days after Katrina and Rita reminded me of how good-hearted our citizens are. The way that my area, SW Louisiana, opened its arms, homes, and hearts to Katrina evacuees, and then responded pro-actively to our own storm, Rita, still moves me deeply. (A shameless plug: My book, Hearts across the Water, is about the good done by our citizens after the Asian tsunami and hurricanes. )
Our citizens are always generous and giving. I’ll not wait until a future disaster to care about my neighbor.

5. Finally, I’ll positively share that there is a spiritual answer for every situation, need, and problem. Without being preachy, I will point others to what I’ve found to be the answer to every need I have: “On Christ the solid rock I stand. All other ground is sinking sand.” When folk’s hearts are changed, families, cities, and a state can be changed.

Well, I’ll end this sermon/post/blog. I’d better get out to the highway, there’s plenty of trash waiting for me.

Let’s make Louisiana the best it can be. Together, we can.

Curt Iles
curtiles@aol.com
http://www.creekbank.net/

About Curt Iles

I write to have influence and impact through well-told stories of my Louisiana and African sojourn.

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3 comments

  1. Great steps to honor your state. After getting to know you, I know at least one great reason to love Louisiana….it sure does crank out awesome talent:)

    CeCe

  2. I agree. I look around at my little town and how it’s changed over the past few years. Some for the better, and some …
    But I’ll stay postive also. We’re blessed to have families move back into our neighborhood with children. It’s our future.
    Blessings from central Louisiana

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