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TheJourney in Africa

Blog #1300 Our most popular blogs over the years

Blog Post  #1300:  Our Most Popular Blogs Today marks the 1300th blog post I’ve published. According to views and shares, here are some of the most popular: Enjoy! *Scroll to the bottom of this post to order a copy of our newest novel, As the Crow ...

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A Neat Essay from a Fellow Missionary

Scott and I worked together in Uganda and South Sudan. This is so well-written I felt led to share. This week’s Refugee Encounter By Scott W. I showed up early, like usual, placed coins in the parking meter and proceeded inside. I looked up his ...

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. . . Was Blind, But Now I See

I could tell you all of the reasons I want our new book, As the Crow Flies, to be in Braille. Instead, I’ll share this story from our time in Chad, Africa:   “Pastor, will you please read Acts 1:8 for us?” The white-haired Mzee ...

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The Sacrifices of a Mother

Of all the things I learned from three years in Africa,  a lasting lesson was the sacrifice of families who serves overseas. Grandchildren grow up a world apart from their grandparents with only yearly (or less) face-to-face visits. Missionaries worry about their aging parents as ...

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A Mother’s Day story for your drive home: “My Mother’s name is Mary”

A word from Curt Enjoy! Be Grateful! LISTEN TO Audio Podcast of this story My Mother is Named Mary   Jesus and His Mother Mary: It’s a reminder that even when your child is perfect(ly obedient) you may not understand him or her.   I’ve ...

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Two Faces: Refugees and Illegals

I never met Tyler Lundin. At least not when he was alive. My journey to learning about his life and death began on a dusty soccer field near the Nile River in Uganda. Africans wear all manner of American shirts and caps.  I always enjoyed ...

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D.W.W. Driving While White

  DWW     Driving While White Like all Americans, I’ve been stunned and confused by events of the past few months. Our country is hurting and is extremely divided. It’s easy to deny and ignore it, but that doesn’t make it not so. As part of ...

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Leaning

Leaning on the Everlasting Arms   “The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms.” –Deuteronomy 33:27   I know it is still there—page 276 in the old Broadman hymnal—that old classic hymn “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms.” I can still hear ...

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Louisiana Evacuees: You may be displaced but never misplaced.

Today’s blog post comes from our new book,  Trampled Grass. Learn how you can download a free copy or buy your autographed copy at www.creekbank.net This story,  “Misplaced” has been on my mind all week. These words are so pertinent during this time of crisis ...

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Holding the Rope

    Each Sunday we share prayer needs. Here are three priorities for this week: Today (July 10) I am sharing about missions at Cold Springs Baptist Church. I’ll be with our lifetime friend, Wade Carroll.  Pray for clarity and passion as I share. I’m ...

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A Memorable Man: Uncle Buddy

A word from Curt This week I’m Camp Missionary at Dry Creek Baptist Camp.  The following story on Buddy Woods and Kenneth Trent reminds me of how important imparting a love of missions is. Enjoy. Uncle Buddy I’ve always loved missionaries. Those who serve God ...

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Sheep need Shepherds

Like Sheep without Shepherd. I understand the term “mass of humanity.” An entire country on the move. Moving away from war and toward the hope of safety. A mass of humanity. I recall cinematic images. Gone with the Wind and the wounded after the Battle ...

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Sad Eyes

A word from Curt Uno. I’m camp missionary at Living Waters Kid’s Camp this week.  Africa and missions are on my mind.  That’s where this story comes from.   It’s a card game called Uno. You know it as a card game. I call it ...

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Two Enduring Lessons.

Pa and Doten

One taught me how to live . . . The other taught me how to die.   They’ve both been gone for nearly half a century. I was seven and ten, respectively when my paternal great grandparents died. We called them Pa and Doten, and ...

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